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June Wintery Highlights

written by Fiona McLellan

A predation at Seal Island, False Bay

Posted on Tuesday, 4 August 2015

Seal Island, False Bay

The first month of our peak season has past already and it certainly has been a tough one for Great White Shark viewing in all aspects, whether for predation photography, cage diving or even just general surface viewing from the boat.


We have seen an increase in predation activity upon arrival at Seal Island each morning, with some predations occurring periodically throughout the morning. Most of the mornings start out being overcast and rainy, with a chilly breeze, thus providing ideal hunting conditions for the Great White sharks.


Activity around the boat has been slow with the sharks not really showing great interest. Despite this, a  +/- 3.8 metre female shark with a large barnacle covered tag on her dorsal fin (put on by Ocearch a few years ago) is becoming a regular and displays great confidence around the cage. This demonstrates the personality of this shark as most great whites tend to be cautious.


One day  after a lovely morning at sea, we came across groupings of Cape Gannets (Morus capensis) dive bombing the water, Greater Crested Terns (Thalasseus bergii) chirping and hovering high about the surface and a large raft of African Penguins (Spheniscus demersus) that were congregating on the calm water feeding on a giant bait ball, presumably Sardines. Whilst observing the incredible birdlife we were most surprised to find we were surrounded by 5 Brydes Whales (Balaenoptera e. brydei) feeding on the sardines. We were able to see each individual whale so clearly! A truly memorable event. 

We have seen an increase in predation activity upon arrival at Seal Island each morning.


Great White Shark Predation, Seal Island - False Bay, Whales

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