quick enquiry sent

from the blog

General News

Old Shark Friends Return to Seal Island

written by Monique Fallows

A Great White shark breaching on a Cape Fur seal.

Posted on Friday, 13 July 2012

One of the most surprising and rewarding aspects of working with Great White sharks is getting to know individual animals and their unique personalities and character.

The Great White shark is an extremely rare animal and this is clearly displayed when we see the same sharks returning to Seal Island each winter, year after year. With the estimated worldwide population suggested to be 2,500 to 3,000 animals it make the life of each shark very important.

Each year during our off season we spare a thought for the perils that the sharks face in our ocean today, and as you can imagine the relief and excitement when we see our regular sharks return back to Seal Island each winter is very real.

This past week we had two of our very favourite sharks sighted at Seal Island. Although they are both males around the same size, the two sharks could not be more different in character.



Cuz is now around 4 meters and not only is he a very good hunter he is also very interactive and relaxed around the boat.

We first saw him in 2003 when he was just under 3 meters in length. He was crazy around the boat, always looking at the bait and the decoy, and constantly putting his head out of the water. He is also very comfortable with the boat and has no problem coming very close. Everyone that see’s him loves him! His behaviour is very similar to that of the famous “Rasta”, an incredibly relaxed and lovable female shark who we thought could only be a vegetarian! Since he was so similiar in behaviour to Rasta, Cuz, seemed a very fitting name.

We often see him hunting and have recorded him making seeing 3 successful kills over a ten day period. He is very determined and does not give up very easily. 


We have seen him twice up at our boat in the last 3 days and he was up to his usual tricks being very playful and fantastic for all to see! 

This is now the tenth year of recording him at Seal Island and he is also around 4 meters in length.

Shy Guy

Shy Guy has the exact opposite personality of Cuz.  He has a badly damaged Tail Fin which is very easy to identify. Every time he successfully hunts a seal and feeds on the surface, the tail fin gives us a clue as to who he is. This past week we again observed him make a successful kill at Seal Island, our first sighting of him during the 2012 shark season. This is now the tenth year of recording him at Seal Island and he is also around 4 meters in length. But, the amazing thing is, in all this time he has only ever come up to the boat once. So, we know he is present at Seal Island at certain times but he is one those sharks that just has no interest in the boat or is perhaps wary of the boat. So, maybe he chooses not to risk something that makes him uncomfortable.

I particularly love sharing the history of this shark to those who believe cage diving vessels condition sharks to attack humans!


It is exciting and amazing to have to of our old shark friends back at Seal Island … long may they both stay …


Great White Shark, Great White Shark Predation, Seal Island - False Bay

Have your say