FAQ

The best time of the year in Cape Town for Great white Shark sightings is mid- June / July. From August to June there is a 50/50 chance however during this period; we are having great success diving with other shark species including the dinosaur of the sea- the Sevengill shark, Mako shark and Blue shark.

This depends on a number of factors including what type of shark diving e.g. scuba, submersible cage and breath hold;  your target species (if you have one) and the time of travel?  It is best to drop us an email and we will advise you accordingly.

Yes, if it is done with respect towards the sharks and other wildlife and remains sensitive to the regulations in place. Our ethical commitment toward the sharks and their conservation determine our every decision and we will not in any way jeopardise the wildlife.

Apex Shark Expeditions is dedicated to showing the sharks the utmost respect. We strive to show you the real shark, not the image popular culture portrays.

In South Africa, law prohibits us from feeding the sharks. We also avoid feeding the sharks for ethical and conservation reasons. We use a point of interest to attract sharks to the boat – like a tuna head that is attached to afloat and a rope and pulled away from the sharks. This bait is used solely as a lure; however some sharks will manage to take the bait.

Absolutely, the South African cage-diving industry is regulated by a code of conduct and regulations from DAFF.

Our main priority is the safety of you, our guest. Our equipment meets all the required safety standards and the experience of our crew ensure that you’re in good hands.

Nature is unpredictable and we cannot guarantee that you will see sharks from the surface or from the cage. However our success rate is high.

You can acquire directions to the M3 highway, from your hotel. Take the M3 Southbound highway towards Muizenberg. Once off of the M3, follow the signs to Muizenberg. From Muizenberg follow the Main Road through to Fish Hoek and then Simon’s Town. This is all on one road and the ocean will be on your left hand side.

Once you reach Simon’s Town, pass the train station on the left side. Approximately 1 kilometre from the train station, turn left into Wharf Street. This will take you into the large pay parking with Simon’s Town Pier in front. All trips depart from the end of the Pier.

It generally takes between 25 – 30 minutes from Simon’s Town Pier to Seal Island. This will also vary depending on the sea and weather conditions, as strong seas and/or strong headwind conditions can lengthen this time.

We will be at sea for between 3 and 4 hours.

White Pointer II is the name of our 32 ft. catamaran. This boat was specifically built for the purpose of working, viewing and diving with Great white sharks in the waters of the Western Cape. The boat carries all the necessary safety equipment and is certified on an annual basis by SAMSA, the authority responsible for maritime safety in South Africa. 

We take a maximum of 12 guests on board, offering the smallest trips in the industry. The other locations take anywhere from 20 to 35 guests on their trips.

Depending on the time of year, the air temperature can be anywhere between 12 and 30 degrees Celsius and the sea temperature anywhere between 12 – 17 degrees Celsius. 

Unfortunately not, Great white sharks are surface feeders and as such, guests who choose not to cage dive will have good sightings of the sharks from our boat.

No. Alcohol is probably the biggest inducer of sea-sickness and we would recommend that you avoid alcohol as much as possible prior to your trip.

No. White Pointer II is a non-smoking vessel. This is both for the comfort of all our guests and for safety reasons.

Hopefully not, you are welcome to take sea-sickness tablets before and / or during your trip, should you feel you need them.

There is no hard and fast rule that prevents sea-sickness, but here are some tips which may help you prevent it:

  1. Avoid any alcohol the evening before your trip, or at least drink with moderation. Alcohol and hangovers are a near guarantee for sea-sickness.
  2. Take an anti-motion sickness tablet the evening before your trip, and another one an hour before boarding the boat (these are available at any pharmacy without prescription – we recommend Dramamine or Stugeron).
  3. During the trip, stay outside of the cabin, remain in the fresh breeze, and avoid the toilet. Keep your eyes on the horizon from the start, and try not to look through your camera’s view finders for too long (most compact digital cameras offer a screen, use this option). If the sea is choppy, avoid going on the top deck where the boat’s movements will be accentuated. Wear comfortable and loose clothing items, or just make yourselves as comfortable as possible by opening buttons or belts.

Lunch consists of fresh fruit, delicious home baked quiches, gourmet sandwiches including chicken with pecan nuts amongst others. We will include a vegetarian option upon request. To quench that adventurous thirst, fruit juice and mineral water are on tap with a variety of snacks that are more on the indulgent side. All food is hygienically prepared and individually packaged using natural recyclable materials that are environmentally friendly.

  • Dress in layers as it can get very chilly at sea.  We advise a warm weather jacket, sneakers or closed shoes, a beanie and a hat/cap.
  • Polarized sunglasses – these really help to block the glare thereby increasing sightings of the sharks from the boat. They also provide protection from harmful UV rays.
  • Swimsuit. If you are prone to the cold. a rash vest will help with extra insulation
  •  Towel
  • Water Bottle
  • Lip-ice and Sunscreen SPF 50 – the African sun is beautiful but harsh
  • Camera, of course! GoPro’s are great for stills and video and are easy to handle in the shark cage. Bring an extra SD card. You’re going to need it!
  • For those with poor eyesight, we advise wearing contact lens whilst cage diving with sharks. If you own a prescription mask, please bring it with you.

It depends entirely on the weather on the day of your trip. 

Patience is an important prerequisite to see wildlife. This is especially true with marine wildlife. Sometimes we wait only a few minutes and other times, we wait several hours after anchoring. Occasionally, we do not see any sharks. Nature and wildlife are unpredictable and sharks are elusive and cautious creatures. 

We cannot give a definitive answer to that question. We believe that sharks have different personalities, probably the result of previous experience. One shark might come up to the lure, have one quick look, not feel confident about the situation, and leave moments later. The next shark might be much more relaxed and remain around the boat for hours. Remember that sharks are curious animals, but their caution is a much stronger instinct. 

One of the great advantages with most sharks is that they are very active at the surface and can be easily observed from the boat without having to go into the shark cage. Surface viewing can sometimes be better than from the cage when underwater visibility is limited. Surface viewing is great and provides you with the best opportunities to capture these amazing and beautiful animals on camera!

We do not recommend our trips for children under 8 years of age. Children are prone to get sea-sick as do adults, but the effect of sea-sickness on children is much more pronounced with dehydration being a big factor.

We most certainly can organise transport and accommodation. The transfers start from R 600 per person return. We would, however, recommend that you stay at least one night in Simon’s Town, preferably the night prior to your trip.

We can arrange accommodation tailored to your needs and budget. Simon’s Town offers many options, from backpackers and guest houses to exclusive lodges. Prices start from R 450 per person per night.

If you just want to see a shark, then one day should be enough (weather permitting).

If you are a shark lover, then we would recommend that you spend at least five days with us. Sharks are intelligent animals and present very different behavioural patterns and attitudes. They display different characteristics; some being very shy or extra cautious, while others are playful and curious in the extreme. Every day at sea is different and we can never predict conditions, situations or encounters. The weather is also a factor, as all trips are weather permitting. 

Simon’s Town is a quaint naval town with restaurants and shops. Activities include excursions to Cape Point, some 20 minutes away, or a brisk walk to the penguins at Boulders Beach. Ocean kayaking and hiking in the surrounding mountains are also great options.

The shark cage is certified by a registered engineer. Further to this the South African cage-diving industry is regulated by a code of conduct and regulations from DAFF.

Their and our main priority is the safety of you, our guest. Our cage is constructed with galvanized steel and has passed all shark cage diving permit conditions. It is a spacious five person cage that floats right next to the boat enabling us to communicate with you while you’re in the cage. Specially designed doors ensure ease of access for divers.

Our equipment meets all the required safety standards and the experience of our crew ensure that you’re in good hands.

White Pointer II is specially designed shark cage diving vessel. She complies with all safety requirements and Great white shark permit conditions. We send the boat for annual safety inspections. Safety equipment includes life jackets, first aid kit, radio and cellular phone. In addition to this, our crew are registered tour guides trained in first aid, fire- fighting and are subjected to stringent monthly safety drills.

Yes, there are two safety bars; the first is positioned at chest level and the second toward the bottom of the cage. The purpose of the lower bar is for the cage diver to hook their feet for stability whilst submerged.

You will communicate verbally with the crew as your head is above water. The shark cage we use is a surface cage. It is not a submersible shark cage. Our crews are close to cage at all times and will ensure any guest in distress is quickly and safely removed from the cage.

You may end your shark cage dive at any time as we operate surface cages only.

We advise donning your bathing suit under your clothes when getting dressed for your trip. A second skin may add extra warmth for the guests who are prone to the cold. Wetsuits and all other dive gear will be provided.

We prefer not to use scuba equipment which produces a lot of noise and bubbles under the water. This often keeps the sharks from coming close. You will have a better chance of seeing the sharks if we can communicate the direction the sharks are coming from, especially when the water visibility is poor. However, if you prefer using scuba equipment and you are a qualified scuba diver, we will provide you with a regulator to dive in the cage once everyone else has had their dive.

Yes, however we wouldn’t recommend the use of scuba equipment in the cage due the affect the bubbles and noise have on the naturally cautious sharks. In high visibility conditions, this becomes less of an issue, but when visibility is not great, we would advise against the use of scuba equipment.

The cage floats and about 70 centimetres of the cage is above the water at all times. The cage is also solidly attached to the boat with two thick ropes that further prevent it from sinking or drifting away. The bottom of the cage is lying about two meters below the surface. 

Yes. The cage is designed to float, leaving a free board of about 30cm (about one foot). The cage is solidly attached to the side of the boat by two thick ropes that prevent the cage from drifting away.

Yes. The lid is closed once you are safely in the cage however it is easily opened either by yourself or the crew.

This depends on the number of guests on the trip who wish to go into the cage. Your first cage dive will be relatively short, just long enough for you to see a shark. Once everyone has had a chance to see the sharks from the cage, you can then return for a second dive, time allowing. You should get 20 – 30 minutes in the cage.

100% safe, it is constructed with galvanised steel and equipped with several independent flotation devices which keep it buoyant.

You need to be comfortable in the water and with the environment one finds themselves in with shark cage diving, it is not advisable.

We encourage it. Don’t forget to bring an extra SD card.

We strongly advise a Go-Pro with a bungee for underwater shots and a pole-cam for surface shots.

Not on the Cape Town, Seal Island trip. The other locations do offer this service at an extra cost.

Children 10 years and older will be allowed into the cage. Parents will need to vouch that their child is comfortable in an aquatic environment.

No – protect, preserve and respect – we do not touch the sharks or any wildlife.

The bait and shark handlers will skilfully bring the sharks alongside the cage for up close and personal experiences, all the time ensuring the sharks are in no danger of hurting themselves.

The sharks are not affected by the cage divers.

Yes, this has no effect on the cage diving experience.

We have a dry cabin on board so rain will not impact the experience too much. It is wind and swell that we are most affected by.

We receive our final weather report at 14h00 each day and the decision to put to sea is made by the skipper based on this weather update. We will, therefore, confirm or cancel the afternoon prior to your trip. 

When making the booking online, you will be requested to pay immediately.

Our guides are registered shark cage Diving guides and have worked with the sharks and wildlife around the island for over 5 years. They are passionate about the animals and will ensure you receive an educational encounter you will remember.

We like to think of our trips as marine seafaris, as we observe and enjoy all the wildlife we come across including dolphin, whales, penguins and seabirds.

While we understand that many of our guests may not want to cage dive in the open ocean and that we used to free dive with Mako and Blues, today we cage dive for the following reasons.

  1. We operate anywhere between 30 to 50km offshore, an area that makes helicopter medical evacuation almost impossible. An easily treatable bite inshore can be a serious and potentially fatal bite offshore.
  2. Currents in the area where we work are reasonably strong. This means guests need to swim constantly just to keep up with the boat. By using a cage our guests are able to take pictures comfortably in a current-free environment. We can also still work in conditions that are fairly rough as the cage is still an option for diving. The open ocean is not protected by the physical features of False Bay and the seas can get rough. Also, when visibility is not so great, we can still dive in the safety of the cage.
  3. Pelagic sharks are not like many other species – they will bite. Thus, to have 10 or more sharks around can be quite disconcerting. By using a cage we do not have to be concerned about how many sharks we have around us.
  4. The cage facilitates more people diving and allows people longer dive times.
  5. The cage in no way deters the sharks. We can actually get divers very close to multiple sharks at a time and in a cage, rather than having to fend sharks off, guests can enjoy viewing them in a relaxed manner.

While we realise that we appear to have done an about turn on our previous offers, we have come to understand the conditions and wildlife we work with better. Our success rate and knowledge of the offshore environment has also improved greatly. Remember that this trip is not just about sharks, but also a huge assortment of wildlife and we make sure to showcase as much of this wildlife as possible, on each trip. We hope that these answers will assist you in taking that all important decision in joining us for a once in a lifetime experience. If you’re looking for more information on trips, please feel free to contact us and we’ll assist you accordingly.

The best time of the year in Cape Town for Great white sShark sightings is mid- June / July. From August to June there is a 50/50 chance however during this period; we are having great success diving with other shark species including the dinosaur of the sea- the Sevengill shark, Mako shark and Blue shark.

This depends on a number of factors including what type of shark diving e.g. scuba, submersible cage and breath hold;  your target species (if you have one) and the time of travel?  It is best to drop us an email and we will advise you accordingly.

Yes, if it is done with respect towards the sharks and other wildlife and remains sensitive to the regulations in place. Our ethical commitment toward the sharks and their conservation determine our every decision and we will not in any way jeopardise the wildlife.

Apex Shark Expeditions is dedicated to showing the sharks the utmost respect. We strive to show you the real shark, not the image popular culture portrays.

In South Africa, law prohibits us from feeding the sharks. We also avoid feeding the sharks for ethical and conservation reasons. We use a point of interest to attract sharks to the boat – like a tuna head that is attached to afloat and a rope and pulled away from the sharks. This bait is used solely as a lure; however some sharks will manage to take the bait.

Absolutely, the South African cage-diving industry is regulated by a code of conduct and regulations from Marine and Coastal Management (DEAT – Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism).

Our main priority is the safety of you, our guest. Our equipment meets all the required safety standards and the experience of our crew ensure that you’re in good hands.

Nature is unpredictable and we cannot guarantee that you will see sharks from the surface or from the cage. However our success rate is high.

You can acquire directions to the M3 highway, from your hotel. Take the M3 Southbound highway towards Muizenberg. Once off of the M3, follow the signs to Muizenberg. From Muizenberg follow the Main Road through to Fish Hoek and then Simon’s Town. This is all on one road and the ocean will be on your left hand side.

Once you reach Simon’s Town, pass the train station on the left side. Approximately 1 kilometre from the train station, turn left into Wharf Street. This will take you into the large pay parking with Simon’s Town Pier in front. All trips depart from the end of the Pier.

It generally takes between 25 – 30 minutes from Simon’s Town Pier to Seal Island. This will also vary depending on the sea and weather conditions, as strong seas and/or strong headwind conditions can lengthen this time.

We will be at sea for between 3 and 4 hours.

White Pointer II is the name of our 32 ft. catamaran. This boat was specifically built for the purpose of working, viewing and diving with Great white sharks in the waters of the Western Cape. The boat carries all the necessary safety equipment and is certified on an annual basis by SAMSA, the authority responsible for maritime safety in South Africa. 

We take a maximum of 12 guests on board, offering the smallest trips in the industry. The other locations take anywhere from 20 to 35 guests on their trips.

Depending on the time of year, the air temperature can be anywhere between 12 and 30 degrees Celsius and the sea temperature anywhere between 12 – 17 degrees Celsius. 

Unfortunately not, Great white sharks are surface feeders and as such, guests who choose not to cage dive will have good sightings of the sharks from our boat. 

No. Alcohol is probably the biggest inducer of sea-sickness and we would recommend that you avoid alcohol as much as possible prior to your trip.

No. White Pointer II is a non-smoking vessel. This is both for the comfort of all our guests and for safety reasons.

Hopefully not, you are welcome to take sea-sickness tablets before and / or during your trip, should you feel you need them.

There is no hard and fast rule that prevents sea-sickness, but here are some tips which may help you prevent it:

  1. Avoid any alcohol the evening before your trip, or at least drink with moderation. Alcohol and hangovers are a near guarantee for sea-sickness.
  2. Take an anti-motion sickness tablet the evening before your trip, and another one an hour before boarding the boat (these are available at any pharmacy without prescription – we recommend Dramamine or Stugeron).
  3. During the trip, stay outside of the cabin, remain in the fresh breeze, and avoid the toilet. Keep your eyes on the horizon from the start, and try not to look through your camera's view finders for too long (most compact digital cameras offer a screen, use this option). If the sea is choppy, avoid going on the top deck where the boat's movements will be accentuated. Wear comfortable and loose clothing items, or just make yourselves as comfortable as possible by opening buttons or belts.

Lunch consists of fresh fruit, delicious home baked quiches, gourmet sandwiches including chicken with pecan nuts amongst others. We will include a vegetarian option upon request. To quench that adventurous thirst, fruit juice and mineral water are on tap with a variety of snacks that are more on the indulgent side. All food is hygienically prepared and individually packaged using natural recyclable materials that are environmentally friendly.

  • Dress in layers as it can get very chilly at sea.  We advise a warm weather jacket, sneakers or closed shoes, a beanie and a hat/cap.
  • Polarized sunglasses – these really help to block the glare thereby increasing sightings of the sharks from the boat. They also provide protection from harmful UV rays.
  • Swimsuit. If you are prone to the cold. a rash vest will help with extra insulation
  •  Towel
  • Water Bottle
  • Lip-ice and Sunscreen SPF 50 – the African sun is beautiful but harsh
  • Camera, of course! GoPro’s are great for stills and video and are easy to handle in the shark cage. Bring an extra SD card. You’re going to need it!
  • For those with poor eyesight, we advise wearing contact lens whilst cage diving with sharks. If you own a prescription mask, please bring it with you.

It depends entirely on the weather on the day of your trip. 

Patience is an important prerequisite to see wildlife. This is especially true with marine wildlife. Sometimes we wait only a few minutes and other times, we wait several hours after anchoring. Occasionally, we do not see any sharks. Nature and wildlife are unpredictable and sharks are elusive and cautious creatures. 

We cannot give a definitive answer to that question. We believe that sharks have different personalities, probably the result of previous experience. One shark might come up to the lure, have one quick look, not feel confident about the situation, and leave moments later. The next shark might be much more relaxed and remain around the boat for hours. Remember that sharks are curious animals, but their caution is a much stronger instinct. 

One of the great advantages with most sharks is that they are very active at the surface and can be easily observed from the boat without having to go into the shark cage. Surface viewing can sometimes be better than from the cage when underwater visibility is limited. Surface viewing is great and provides you with the best opportunities to capture these amazing and beautiful animals on camera!

We do not recommend our trips for children under 8 years of age. Children are prone to get sea-sick as do adults, but the effect of sea-sickness on children is much more pronounced with dehydration being a big factor.

We most certainly can organise transport and accommodation. The transfers start from R 600 per person return. We would, however, recommend that you stay at least one night in Simon’s Town, preferably the night prior to your trip.

We can arrange accommodation tailored to your needs and budget. Simon’s Town offers many options, from backpackers and guest houses to exclusive lodges. Prices start from R 450 per person per night.

If you just want to see a shark, then one day should be enough (weather permitting).

 If you are a shark lover, then we would recommend that you spend at least five days with us. Sharks are intelligent animals and present very different behavioural patterns and attitudes. They display different characteristics; some being very shy or extra cautious, while others are playful and curious in the extreme. Every day at sea is different and we can never predict conditions, situations or encounters. The weather is also a factor, as all trips are weather permitting. 

Simon’s Town is a quaint naval town with restaurants and shops. Activities include excursions to Cape Point, some 20 minutes away, or a brisk walk to the penguins at Boulders Beach. Ocean kayaking and hiking in the surrounding mountains are also great options.

The shark cage is certified by a registered engineer. Further to this the South African cage-diving industry is regulated by a code of conduct and regulations from Marine and Coastal Management (DEAT – Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism).

Their and our main priority is the safety of you, our guest. Our cage is constructed with galvanized steel and has passed all shark cage diving permit conditions. It is a spacious five person cage that floats right next to the boat enabling us to communicate with you while you're in the cage. Specially designed doors ensure ease of access for divers.

Our equipment meets all the required safety standards and the experience of our crew ensure that you’re in good hands.

White Pointer II is specially designed shark cage diving vessel. She complies with all safety requirements and Great white shark permit conditions. We send the boat for annual safety inspections. Safety equipment includes life jackets, first aid kit, radio and cellular phone. In addition to this, our crew are registered tour guides trained in first aid, fire- fighting and are subjected to stringent monthly safety drills.

Yes, there are two safety bars; the first is positioned at chest level and the second toward the bottom of the cage. The purpose of the lower bar is for the cage diver to hook their feet for stability whilst submerged.

You will communicate verbally with the crew as your head is above water. The shark cage we use is a surface cage. It is not a submersible shark cage. Our crews are close to cage at all times and will ensure any guest in distress is quickly and safely removed from the cage.

You may end your shark cage dive at any time as we operate surface cages only.

We advise donning your bathing suit under your clothes when getting dressed for your trip. A second skin may add extra warmth for the guests who are prone to the cold. Wetsuits and all other dive gear will be provided.

We prefer not to use scuba equipment which produces a lot of noise and bubbles under the water. This often keeps the sharks from coming close. You will have a better chance of seeing the sharks if we can communicate the direction the sharks are coming from, especially when the water visibility is poor. However, if you prefer using scuba equipment and you are a qualified scuba diver, we will provide you with a regulator to dive in the cage once everyone else has had their dive.

Yes, however we wouldn’t recommend the use of scuba equipment in the cage due the affect the bubbles and noise have on the naturally cautious sharks. In high visibility conditions, this becomes less of an issue, but when visibility is not great, we would advise against the use of scuba equipment.

The cage floats and about 70 centimetres of the cage is above the water at all times. The cage is also solidly attached to the boat with two thick ropes that further prevent it from sinking or drifting away. The bottom of the cage is lying about two meters below the surface. 

Yes. The cage is designed to float, leaving a free board of about 30cm (about one foot). The cage is solidly attached to the side of the boat by two thick ropes that prevent the cage from drifting away.

We have a five man cage.

Yes. The lid is closed once you are safely in the cage however it is easily opened either by yourself or the crew.

This depends on the number of guests on the trip who wish to go into the cage. Your first cage dive will be relatively short, just long enough for you to see a shark. Once everyone has had a chance to see the sharks from the cage, you can then return for a second dive, time allowing. You should get 20 – 30 minutes in the cage.

100% safe, it is constructed with galvanised steel and equipped with several independent flotation devices which keep it buoyant.

You need to be comfortable in the water and with the environment one finds themselves in with shark cage diving, it is not advisable.

We encourage it. Don’t forget to bring an extra SD card.

We strongly advise a Go- Pro with a bungee for underwater shots and a pole-cam for surface shots.

Not on the Cape Town, Seal Island trip. The other locations do offer this service at an extra cost.

Children 10 years and older will be allowed into the cage. Parents will need to vouch that their child is comfortable in an aquatic environment.

No - protect, preserve and respect - we do not touch the sharks or any wildlife.

Answer: The bait and shark handlers will skilfully bring the sharks alongside the cage for up close and personal experiences, all the time ensuring the sharks are in no danger of hurting themselves.

The sharks are not affected by the cage divers.

Yes, this has no effect on the cage diving experience.

We have a dry cabin on board so rain will not impact the experience too much. It is wind and swell that we are most affected by.

We receive our final weather report at 14h00 each day and the decision to put to sea is made by the skipper based on this weather update. We will, therefore, confirm or cancel the afternoon prior to your trip. 

When making the booking online, you will be requested to pay immediately.

Our guides are registered shark cage Diving guides and have worked with the sharks and wildlife around the island for over 5 years. They are passionate about the animals and will ensure you receive an educational encounter you will remember.

We like to think of our trips as marine seafaris, as we observe and enjoy all the wildlife we come across including dolphin, whales, penguins and seabirds.

While we understand that many of our guests may not want to cage dive in the open ocean and that we used to free dive with Mako and Blues, today we cage dive for the following reasons.

  1. We operate anywhere between 30 to 50km offshore, an area that makes helicopter medical evacuation almost impossible. An easily treatable bite inshore can be a serious and potentially fatal bite offshore.
  2. Currents in the area where we work are reasonably strong. This means guests need to swim constantly just to keep up with the boat. By using a cage our guests are able to take pictures comfortably in a current-free environment. We can also still work in conditions that are fairly rough as the cage is still an option for diving. The open ocean is not protected by the physical features of False Bay and the seas can get rough. Also, when visibility is not so great, we can still dive in the safety of the cage.
  3. Pelagic sharks are not like many other species – they will bite. Thus, to have 10 or more sharks around can be quite disconcerting. By using a cage we do not have to be concerned about how many sharks we have around us.
  4. The cage facilitates more people diving and allows people longer dive times.
  5. The cage in no way deters the sharks. We can actually get divers very close to multiple sharks at a time and in a cage, rather than having to fend sharks off, guests can enjoy viewing them in a relaxed manner.
While we realise that we appear to have done an about turn on our previous offers, we have come to understand the conditions and wildlife we work with better. Our success rate and knowledge of the offshore environment has also improved greatly. Remember that this trip is not just about sharks, but also a huge assortment of wildlife and we make sure to showcase as much of this wildlife as possible, on each trip. We hope that these answers will assist you in taking that all important decision in joining us for a once in a lifetime experience. If you’re looking for more information on trips, please feel free to contact us and we’ll assist you accordingly.

The First Choice Shark Cage Diving Operator For:

Next trip departing Seal Island to dive with Sevengill sharks is this Saturday, 20 February.

There is limited space.

Book now to avoid disappointment.